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NMSAT — Networked Music & Sound Art Timeline

A Panoramic View of Practices & Techniques Related to Sound Transmission and Distance :

Archeology, Genealogy and Sound Anthropology of the Internet Auditoriums and the Distance Listening


A Locus Sonus project (2008-2012)Access to the database : (not yet complete) http://locusonus.org/nmsat/







  1. PUBLISHINGS

  • (peer review submitted)


    • Download this article (French version) http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_pdf_round.png - Read this article (wiki page) (French version) http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_page_grey2.png
      NMSAT Historique de l'art audio et de la musique en réseau — Un Fonds Documentaire sur les pratiques et techniques liées aux transports de sons et aux actions sonores à distance
      Jérôme Joy & Peter Sinclair — (2009)
      (Version française / French version)
      (English version published in “Contemporary Music Review”, Vol. 28, Nos. 4 & 5 ”Network Performance”, August/October 2009, pp. 351-361, Edited by Peter Nelson, Issue editor Pedro Rebelo. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group)
      Access to the issue : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcmr20/28/4-5



    • Download this article http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_pdf_round.png - Read this article (wiki page) http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_page_grey2.png
      Networked Music & Soundart Timeline (NMSAT): A Panoramic View of Practices and Techniques Related to Sound Transmission and Distance Listening
      Jérôme Joy & Peter Sinclair — (2009)
      (English version)
      (In “Contemporary Music Review”, Vol. 28, Nos. 4 & 5 ”Network Performance”, August/October 2009, pp. 351-361, Edited by Peter Nelson, Issue editor Pedro Rebelo. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group)
      Access to the issue : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcmr20/28/4-5

      Abstract : In 2008, Jérôme Joy initiated the ‘Networked Music & SoundArt Timeline’ (NMSAT)—a monitor on the history of networked music and sound. The Timeline is maintained by the NMSAT Development Committee, consisting primarily of researchers and artists from partner institutions. The team is complemented by a pool of authors and editors contributing to Locus Sonus's projects (such as, for instance, members of WLP – World Listening Project) and individuals who are part of other collaborative projects. The Committee has two major objectives: to amend and expand the existing database comprised currently of more than 2,000 entries and approximately 550 reference articles (NMSAT v.1.090319, March 2009); and to support the online technical and editorial development of the project. This article describes the current state of the timeline and the way in which it has been structured, as well as its evolution towards an open resource database accessible through a variety of specialized interfaces. NMSAT is part of the Locus Sonus research program and provides an essential historical backbone to practice-based artistic research and the exploration of developing technologies.



    • Download this article http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_pdf_round.png
      Networked Music & Soundart Timeline (NMSAT): Excerpts of Part One: Ancient and Modern History, Anticipatory Literature, and Technical Developments References
      Jérôme Joy — (2009)
      (English version)
      (In “Contemporary Music Review”, Vol. 28, Nos. 4 & 5 ”Network Performance”, August/October 2009, pp. 449-490, Edited by Peter Nelson, Issue editor Pedro Rebelo. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group)
      Access to the issue : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcmr20/28/4-5

      Abstract : This article presents a sample of references present in the existing Networked Music & SoundArt Timeline (NMSAT) database. The NMSAT is a research project led and initiated in 2008 by Jérôme Joy within the Locus Sonus lab. It is conceived as a monitor and a pool of informations on history of networked music and sound (Joy & Sinclair, 2009). It aims to provide an overview of practices and techniques in the realm of networked music and networked sonic performance from ancient history to the present (2008), related to sound transmission and distance listening. It consists of a collection of references from various online and bibliographical documents, articles, workshop notes and so on. The NMSAT offers a valuable resource made available to actors in the artistic and scientific spheres. Because it is not possible to summarise in one article the large spectrum of references from all periods, we decided to present a sample related to Part 1 of the database (Part 2 concerns references of networked music and soundart, technological developments and contemporary history; Part 3 contains a bibliography of reference papers). This sample lists a selection of references covering the period from the sixteenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century, just before the major developments of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell and Elisha Gray from 1876. Situated before the realisation of apparatuses of telecommunication, the selected period can reveal, across the interactions between inventions, ‘uchronias’ (alternate history) and anticipation (Apollinaire, 1916; see also Valéry, 1960 [1928]), the paradigm of listening, and of manufacturing listenings, involved in the systems of sound transmission (and transport) and sound actions at a distance. This will highlight the contextualisation and foster analysis of the development of audio networked practices towards an ‘organology’ (the science of musical instruments and their classification, and more largely, the science of organs or of anything considered as an organic structure) of such of systems and the exploration of the soniferous condition of electronic networks (interconnected spaces, audiences and ‘streamers’) (Joy, 2009). Of course, all the other periods, before and after these dates, are covered by the existing database currently developed by the NMSAT group. Currently this database comprises more than 1400 pages. This selection illustrates the historical and theoretical context of networked music and soundart, and more largely of network art.



    • Download this article http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_pdf_round.png - unabridged version http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_pdf_round.png - Facsimile (proof free copy) http://joy.nujus.net/files/img/icon_pdf_round.png
      What NMSAT says about sonification
      Jérôme Joy — (2010-2012)
      (English version)
      (In “AI & Society : Knowledge, Culture and Communication”, Vol. 27:2, ”Proceedings of Locus Sonus Symposium : « Sonification (What, Where, How, Why) »”, May 2012, pp. 233-244, Edited by Karamjit S. Gill, Victoria Vesna, David Smith and Richard Ennals, Issue editor Peter Sinclair / Locus Sonus. London : Springer (Pub.))
      Access to the issue : http://rd.springer.com/journal/146/27/2/page/1

      Abstract : This article presents a sample of references issuing directly from the existing NMSAT database. The method employed—that of systematically probing the database—reveals forms of sonification, but also hypothetical premises of sonification, covering the period from ancient times to the beginning of the twentieth century. The following are some of the categories of sonification that have emerged as a result of this search: Natural phenomenon & meteorology to sound (autophones); Image to sound; Text & communication to sound; Human & machine activities to sound (auditing); Localisation to sound (sonar); Architecture & geometry & abstract proportions to sound (scalization, transcription, & spatialization); Energy to sound; Human body to sound; Distance to sound (distance listening); Movement to sound (holophony, kynophony); and Interpreted observations to sound (naturalist music, transpositions & analogies, paraphrasing). The search also uncovered other principals and practices in the vicinity of sonification including: audification, auditing, auscultation, auralization, soniculation, transduction, mapping, earcons, auditory icons, sympathy, echometry, etc. It has been decided to summarise the results of « What NMSAT Says About Sonification » in this special issue of AI&Society, access to the unabridged version of article is available here: http://www.locusonus.org/sonification/.






   
   
   
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